Bob Owens

The saddest truth in politics is that people get the leaders they deserve

Sunday morning garden blogging: dirty hoe edition

Written By: Bob - May• 19•13
The only dirty hoe I'll allow in my yard. Old and well worn, it none the less does the bulk of the weeding, soil prep, and soil mixing in our various food plots.

The only dirty hoe I’ll allow in my yard. Old and well worn, it nonetheless does the bulk of the weeding, soil prep, and soil mixing in our various food plots.

It’s not even June yet, but I’ve already been able to harvest a little bit of what we’ve planted, and it was delicious.

Radishes

Radishes

The radishes were pretty dang good, though it wasn’t until after the fact that I read radish greens are supposed to be pretty good as a pungent, peppery salad green. I’ll have to try that on the next batch.

We’re learning that the windswept conditions in our neighborhood aren’t exactly great for tall plants, as the corn in my three sister’s garden is taking a beating.

wind-blown corn

wind-blown corn

Five days ago, it was leaning to the east. Three days ago, it was leaning to the the west. Now, it’s leaning to the east again. I’m just surprised that it is still (mostly) hanging in there and continuing to grow. I planted the pole beans the beginning of the week that should grow up the corn stalks and give them some support, so let’s hope they last long enough to get that support. I’ve also planted four kinds of squash, and we’ll hopefully see that germinate and start to come up in the week ahead.  I’ve transitioned the 13 pepper plants that germinated to the soil in two different plots,  putting five in the 3 sisters garden around the edges and eight against the fence in the “sacrificial” plot.

The sacrificial plot is mostly corn, with a few leftovers and odds and ends, planted on the back side of the fence to feed the neighborhood wildlife. So far, it seems to be avoiding the wind problems entirely. It will stink if the raccoons get more corn than I do.

'coon food.

‘coon food. No, it will not be actively weeded.

The potatoes are getting… interesting.

taters. Purchased seed potatoes on the outside, and groceries that sprouted in the middle.

Taters. Purchased seed potatoes on the outside, and groceries that sprouted in the middle.

The two outside plants look fine, and seem to be thriving despite the recent temperature spikes into the mid-80s. The two middle buckets, which came from some “Yukon Gold” potatoes that I’d found in the pantry, had a few plants that went south in the past few days that I had to pull because they started looking slimy and were dying. The other plants in the middle buckets seemed fine. There was one tuber about the size of a gold ball on one of the three plants I pulled, and some of you had suggested earlier that they’d been treated with some sort of growth inhibitors. I’m hoping the ones that are supposed to be seed stock are doing better, but we won’t know until harvest time if they performed better than the pantry leftovers.

In the “science experiment” part of the garden, the celery based we’d planted seems to be hanging in there, if not growing like gangbusters.

celery, planted from the leftover base after we ate the rest of the plant.

celery, planted from the leftover base after we ate the rest of the plant.

We’ve take the based of two pieces of romaine lettuce and put them on to soak to see if they sprout like the celery did, and we’ve planted two cloves of garlic that were leftover from dinner a few weeks back. If we can recycle edibles like this, that will be a neat way to cut into our food bill. If it works, I’ll be planting bacon next week.

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2 Comments

  1. dontduckwithme says:

    I just read this weekend that the green part of the celery is the most nutritious part, although the stalk tastes better with cream cheese.

    > If it works, I’ll be planting bacon next week.

    With today’s genetics, it doesn’t take long to get a
    pig to market weight. We just put two in the freezer.
    I know of several people who raise hogs in town, in their dirt floor basements –

  2. You need mulch, my friend. Lots and lots of mulch. It does amazing things, like keep moisture in, keep weeds down, and promote the growth of beneficial micro-fungi.